17 May 2018

How Gamification Supercharges Employee Performance in the Contact Center

Written by Danielle Wong, Posted in Contact Center, Unified Communications, ComputerTalk

First thing’s first: What is gamification?

According to Gartner, "gamification is the use of game mechanics to drive engagement in non-game business scenarios and to change behaviors in a target audience to achieve business outcomes." By applying activities and this game thinking methodology to the workplace, this can lead to greater contact center results, benefitting both employees and the organization itself. Through leaderboards, points, challenges, and incentives, gamification can help motivate and engage contact center users. For users to be successful in their role, employee motivation is a crucial component to deliver the best experience for their customers.

What is the value of implementing gamification in your contact center?

When implementing new strategies in organizations, the questions always asked are: Is it worth it and how will we measure success? To determine the return on investment, gamification involves tracking key performance indicators (KPIs) of contact center employees during their shifts. Some examples of KPIs that are measured include the average time contacts spend in queue, the average speed of answer, first contact resolution, total call duration, etc. These KPIs differ from organization to organization, but the metrics are utilized to motivate agents to improve performance by reaching goals and competing against each other.

How will this benefit the organization?

One of the benefits of implementing a gamification strategy in your contact center is improved employee performance. If agents perform well, then the company performs well. Consequently, this leads to organizational growth with their people, products, and service.

21 February 2018

Small contact center, big data

Written by Martin Borowski, Posted in Contact Center, ComputerTalk

Do you know how much data is generated by your contact center? The answer might surprise you. Even the smallest contact centers that field only 100s of calls per day are generating massive amounts of data.

Whether your contact center handles 100 calls per day, or 10 000 calls per day, you have a significant data source on your hands.It’s easy to collect data, but it is crucial that you know how to sift through it and, more importantly, how to use it.

Data sources

The contact center operates in an environment involving various internal and external stakeholders, as well as multiple channels. This means that the enormous amount of data entering the contact center is coming through a number of sources and in many different formats. Here are some of the most common data sources in the contact center:

  • Text-based transcripts, such as email, SMS, and IM
  • Voice call recordings
  • Screen recordings
  • IVR data, including menu choices and information entered
  • Queuing information, such as time spent in queue
  • Data from integration sources, such as a CRM
  • Manual input information from agents

As you can see, there is a significant amount of data flowing in and out of the contact center at all times, from a number of sources. The job of the contact center is to collect all of that information, and to provide tools to optimize business processes by understanding the data. How are you using your data?